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SOC 1101 : Introduction to Sociology
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Filiz Garip
Xuewen Yan
This course is a broad introduction to the field of sociology.  Course materials are designed to illustrate the distinctive features of the sociological perspective and to start you thinking sociologically about yourself and the broader social world.  To think sociologically is to recognize that being embedded in the world constrains behavior, and that individuals are both social actors and social products.  To think sociologically is also to recognize that our contemporary world, with its enduring cultural, political, and economic institutions, is as much a social product as we are.  We will begin by covering theoretical and methodological foundations of the sociological perspective.  We will go on to explore the concept of social stratification and will survey primary axes of social difference.  In the second half of the course we will look more closely at how individuals relate to each other, how social inequality is enacted and reinforced in everyday life, and at the way in which the organization of social life shapes individuals and groups, such as through social networks, residential neighborhoods, schooling, families, and on-line communication.
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SOC 1101 : Introduction to Sociology
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Kendra Bischoff
This course is a broad introduction to the field of sociology.  Course materials are designed to illustrate the distinctive features of the sociological perspective and to start you thinking sociologically about yourself and the broader social world.  To think sociologically is to recognize that being embedded in the world constrains behavior, and that individuals are both social actors and social products.  To think sociologically is also to recognize that our contemporary world, with its enduring cultural, political, and economic institutions, is as much a social product as we are.  We will begin by covering theoretical and methodological foundations of the sociological perspective.  We will go on to explore the concept of social stratification and will survey primary axes of social difference.  In the second half of the course we will look more closely at how individuals relate to each other, how social inequality is enacted and reinforced in everyday life, and at the way in which the organization of social life shapes individuals and groups, such as through social networks, residential neighborhoods, schooling, families, and on-line communication.
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SOC 1290 : American Society through Film
Crosslisted as: AMST 1290 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
David Strang
Introduces students to the sociological analysis of American society through the lens of film. Major themes involve race, class, and gender; upward and downward mobility; incorporation and exclusion; small town vs the big city; and cultural conflicts over individualism, achievement, and community. We match a range of movies like American Graffiti (Lucas), Ace in the Hole (Wilder), The Asphalt Jungle (Houston), Do the Right Thing (Lee), The Heiress (Wyler), High Noon (Zinnemann), Mean Streets (Scorsese), Nashville (Altman), The Philadelphia Story (Cukor), and A Streetcar Named Desire (Kazan). Each film is paired with social scientific research that examines parallel topics, such as analyses of who goes to college, the production of news, deviant careers, urban riots, the gendered presentation of self, and the prisoner's dilemma.
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SOC 1900 : Discussions of Justice
Crosslisted as: GOVT 1901, PHIL 1901, GOVT 1901, PHIL 1901, GOVT 1901, PHIL 1901, GOVT 1901, PHIL 1901 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Alex Esposito
August Faller
Matthew Paskell
John Proios
This course will address questions of justice posed by current political controversies, for example, controversies over immigration, economic inequality, American nationalism, the government's role in healthcare and the environment, racial inequality, the political power of elites, populism, authoritarianism, globalization, and the proper use of America's global power. Brief readings in political philosophy and social science will be starting points for informal discussion and mutual learning among diverse perspectives.
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SOC 1900 : Discussions of Justice
Crosslisted as: GOVT 1901, PHIL 1901, GOVT 1901, PHIL 1901, GOVT 1901, PHIL 1901 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Avi Appel
Quitterie Gounot
Elizabeth Southgate
This course will address questions of justice posed by current political controversies, for example, controversies over immigration, economic inequality, American nationalism, the government's role in healthcare and the environment, racial inequality, the political power of elites, populism, authoritarianism, globalization, and the proper use of America's global power. Brief readings in political philosophy and social science will be starting points for informal discussion and mutual learning among diverse perspectives.
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SOC 2070 : Social Problems in the United States
Crosslisted as: AMST 2070, PAM 2250 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Peter Rich
"Social Problems in the U.S." introduces the causes, consequences, and possible solutions of major issues facing U.S. society today. Students learn how social problems are defined and contested in the public sphere, and how various perspectives reflect underlying debates about social norms and values. Through readings, lectures, in-class discussion, and writing assignments, students explore a range of social problems in depth, such as: childhood poverty, racial segregation and discrimination, crime, civil and human rights abuses, job insecurity, family instability, discrimination by sexual identity, unequal pay for women's work, and gender imbalances in family life. Students study the historical and social roots of these various issues, bringing into focus how individual experiences and choices are embedded within a broader social structure.
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SOC 2090 : Networks
Crosslisted as: CS 2850, ECON 2040, INFO 2040 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
David Easley
Jon Kleinberg
This interdisciplinary course examines network structures and how they matter in everyday life. The course examines how each of the computing, economic, sociological and natural worlds are connected and how the structure of these connections affects each of these worlds. Tools of graph theory and game theory are taught and then used to analyze networks. Topics covered include the web, the small world phenomenon, markets, neural networks, contagion, search and the evolution of networks.
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SOC 2190 : Introduction to Economic Sociology
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Victor Nee
Economic sociology extends the sociological approach to the study of the economy.  The goal is to understand the relationship between social structure and economic action. We explore how people find jobs, rely on social networks to share knowledge and information, acquire and utilize cultural, social and political capital, establish trust, sustain cooperation, and start up firms in the American and global economy
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SOC 2190 : Introduction to Economic Sociology
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Victor Nee
What is the driving force behind economic growth? How do people find jobs? Does culture matter for economic action? What exactly is a market? Why is there a concentration of high-tech firms in Silicon Valley? Why has entrepreneurial capitalism emerged in China? These are some of the questions that this course will explore through the theoretical lens of economic sociology. Economic sociology has sought to understand the beliefs, norms, and institutions that shape and drive the global economy. It has sought to extend the sociological approach to the study of economic life by studying the interactions between social structure and economic action. The systematic application of sociological reasoning to explain economic action involves analysis of the ways in which social networks, norms, and institutions matter in economic transactions. The goal of this course is to provide an introduction to economic sociology as an approach and research program to understand and explain the relationship between economy and society in the modern era.
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SOC 2202 : Population Dynamics
Crosslisted as: DSOC 2010 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Alaka Basu
Introduction to population studies. The primary focus is on the relationships between demographic processes (fertility, mortality, and immigration) and social and economic issues. Discussion covers special topics related to population growth and spatial distribution, including marriage and family formation, population aging, changing roles and statuses of women, labor force participation, immigrations, urban growth and urbanization, resource allocation, and the environment.
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SOC 2206 : International Development
Crosslisted as: DSOC 2050, DSOC 2050 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Philip McMichael
International development concerns the gains, losses and tensions associated with the process of social change - as it affects human populations, social institutions and the environment. This course considers development as an evolving world project and from the perspective of its social and ecological impact: asking questions about costs and benefits of economic growth, about the global context (geo-political, institutional, production, consumption, and discursive relations), and the sustainability of various models. We relate development trends in the South/Third World with those in the North/First World. We also examine shared, global issues, such as the environment, human rights, security, and their condition in different parts of the world. In examining development historically, we encourage students to situate trends shaping the twenty-first century world, and how they can contribute, as global citizens, to the ongoing debate about how to reformulate development as an inclusive an empowering social process. This course combines Lectures with discussion, and uses films and section discussions to promote reflection on diversity of cultures and understandings of human development. It also includes a special component (access by instructor permission), in conjunction with Cornell's Writing in the Majors Program. This is worth an additional credit hour, and is for advanced students. These students will meet additionally in weekly Sections with a Writing Instructor from Development Sociology for a special topic focus to enhance understanding of course material as well as writing skills.
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SOC 2206 : International Development
Crosslisted as: DSOC 2050 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Philip McMichael
International development concerns the gains, losses and tensions associated with the process of social change - as it affects human populations, social institutions and the environment. This course considers development as an evolving world project and from the perspective of its social and ecological impact: asking questions about costs and benefits of economic growth, about the global context (geo-political, institutional, production, consumption, and discursive relations), and the sustainability of various models. We relate development trends in the South/Third World with those in the North/First World. We also examine shared, global issues, such as the environment, human rights, security, and their condition in different parts of the world. In examining development historically, we encourage students to situate trends shaping the twenty-first century world, and how they can contribute, as global citizens, to the ongoing debate about how to reformulate development as an inclusive an empowering social process. This course combines Lectures with discussion, and uses films and section discussions to promote reflection on diversity of cultures and understandings of human development. It also includes a special component (access by instructor permission), in conjunction with Cornell's Writing in the Majors Program. This is worth an additional credit hour, and is for advanced students. These students will meet additionally in weekly Sections with a Writing Instructor from Development Sociology for a special topic focus to enhance understanding of course material as well as writing skills.
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SOC 2208 : Social Inequality
Crosslisted as: DSOC 2090, PAM 2208 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Kim Weeden
This course reviews contemporary approaches to understanding social inequality and the processes by which it comes to be seen as legitimate, natural, or desirable.  We address questions of the following kind:  What are the major forms of stratification in human history?  Are inequality and poverty inevitable?  How many social classes are there in advanced industrialism societies?  Is there a "ruling class?"  Are lifestyles, attitudes, and personalities shaped fundamentally by class membership?  Can individuals born into poverty readily escape their class origins and move upward in the class structure?  Are social contacts and "luck" important forces in matching individuals to jobs and class positions?  What types of social processes serve to maintain and alter racial, ethnic, and gender discrimination in labor markets?  Is there an "underclass?"  These and other questions are addressed in light of classical and contemporary theory and research.
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SOC 2220 : Controversies About Inequality
Crosslisted as: AMST 2225, DSOC 2220, GOVT 2225, ILROB 2220, PAM 2220, PHIL 1950 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Cristobal Young
In recent years, poverty and inequality have become increasingly common topics of public debate, as academics, journalists, and politicians attempt to come to terms with growing income inequality, with the increasing visibility of inter-country differences in wealth and income, and with the persistence of racial, ethnic, and gender stratification. This course introduces students to ongoing social scientific debates about the sources and consequences of inequality, as well as the types of public policy that might appropriately be pursued to reduce (or increase) inequality. These topics will be addressed in related units, some of which include guest lectures by faculty from other universities (funded by the Center for the Study of Inequality). Each unit culminates with a highly spirited class discussion and debate.
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SOC 2250 : Schooling and Society
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Kendra Bischoff
The primary goal of this course is to understand the relationship between education and society, with an emphasis on exploring educational inequality. To accomplish this, we will ask questions such as: What is the purpose and product of schools? How do schools reproduce social class, racial, and gender inequality? What is the relationship between education and future success? How are schools structured? What factors increase educational success? To answer these, and related questions, we will use classical and contemporary sociological theory and research. The course culminates in a research project of each student's own choosing.
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SOC 2320 : Social Identities and Interaction in Everyday Life
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Melissa Pirkey
How do we develop and manage our identities in an increasingly complex world? How are our identities formed through interactions with other people, the groups to which we belong, and the groups from which we may be excluded? How has social media changed the way that we that develop our l identities and present them to others? Why do some identities become stigmatized, and what are some ways that people who have stigmatized identities manage that stigma in interactions with others? We will address these, and related, questions about l identity and interaction using the insights of the theoretical, experimental, survey-based, and qualitative sociological literatures.
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SOC 2330 : Religion and Social Life
Crosslisted as: RELST 2330 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Rick Moore
Global conflicts, raising children, electing presidents, praying for a loved one: from the mundane to the extraordinary, religion plays a significant role in social life, regardless of whether or not one considers oneself "religious." In this course we will investigate religion and its impacts in society from a sociological perspective. Questions we will ask include: How does religion "fit" into society? What are the contours of contemporary religion in the United States and around the world? How do religious identities interact with other aspects of social life, including gender, race and politics? In what ways have religions and religious life changed over time? As social scientists, how can we best study religion? The course will use examples from a variety of religious and secular traditions to help us understand religion's sociological significance in the contemporary world.
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SOC 2340 : Culture and Consumption
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Melissa Pirkey
This course explores how the goods and experiences we consume hold meaning within a culture and, as a result, affect our social lives. Readings and course discussion will focus on how consumption practices — what we consume and how we consume it — offer clues into our social position, communicate our values, identify those who are similar and those who are different from us, establish subcultural boundaries, and help us form and maintain social relationships. We will also discuss divesting practices — that is, getting rid of our stuff -- and alternatives to consumerism such as anti-consumerism, post-consumerism, and prosumerism. The course will focus primarily on the culture of consumption in the United States, but integrates scholarship on other countries and geopolitical contexts when possible.
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SOC 2390 : Modern Romance: Sex, Love, and Union Formation in the Internet Age
Crosslisted as: PAM 2390 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Sharon Sassler
Looking for love in the digital age is quite different from the ways our ancestors met and found mates in previous generations.  Today's young adults are delaying marriage and embarking on new ways of meeting partners, and entering into different types of unions.  This course draws from the demographic, sociological, economic, and psychological literature to explore changes in sexual and romantic attachments, and how they vary across time, and over the life course.
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SOC 2460 : Drugs and Society
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Douglas Heckathorn
The course focuses on drug use and abuse as a social rather than as a medical or psychopathological phenomenon. Specifically, the course deals with the history of drug use and regulatory attempts in the United States and around the world; the relationship between drug use and racism/class conflict; pharmacology and use patterns related to specific drugs; perspectives on the etiology of drug use/abuse; AIDS prevention and harm reduction interventions; drug-using subcultures; drug policy, drug legislation, and drug enforcement; and the promotion and condemnation of drug activities in the mass media.
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SOC 2560 : Sociology of Law
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Erin York Cornwell
This course provides an introduction to the sociological perspective of law and legal institutions in modern society. A key question is the extent to which the law creates and maintains social order. And, what is its role in social change? We will review theoretical perspectives on the reciprocal relationship between law and society, and consider how this relationship is reflected in contemporary legal issues. Empirical research covered in this course will examine social interactions among actors within legal institutions (including the criminal courts, law school classrooms, and the jury room), and how individuals experience and utilize the law in everyday life.
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SOC 2560 : Sociology of Law
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Erin York Cornwell
This course provides an introduction to the sociological perspective of law and legal institutions in modern society. A key question is the extent to which the law creates and maintains social order. And, what is its role in social change? We will review theoretical perspectives on the reciprocal relationship between law and society, and consider how this relationship is reflected in contemporary legal issues. Empirical research covered in this course will examine social interactions among actors within legal institutions (including the criminal courts, law school classrooms, and the jury room), and how individuals experience and utilize the law in everyday life.
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SOC 2580 : Six Pretty Good Books: Explorations in Social Science
Crosslisted as: HD 2580, ILRLR 2580, PSYCH 2580 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Stephen Ceci
Michael Macy
This course is modeled after "Great Books" literature courses in the humanities, but with two important differences: we read non-fiction books in the social sciences rather than the humanities, written by highly prominent contemporary social scientists. The course title refers to the fact that the books are new, hence their potential greatness has yet to be confirmed by the test of time. We choose living authors to give students a unique opportunity: to interact with each of the six authors in Q&A sessions in person or via video conferencing. This fall some of the authors will appear in person for Q&A and the others will Skype with the class.
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SOC 2650 : Latinos in the United States
Crosslisted as: AMST 2655, DSOC 2650, LSP 2010 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Hector Velez
Exploration and analysis of the Hispanic experience in the United States. Examines the sociohistorical background and economic, psychological, and political factors that converge to shape a Latino group identity in the United States. Perspectives are suggested and developed for understanding Hispanic migrations, the plight of Latinos in urban and rural areas, and the unique problems faced by the diverse Latino groups. Groups studied include Mexican Americans, Dominicans, Cubans, and Puerto Ricans.
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SOC 2810 : Migration: Histories, Controversies, & Perspectives
Crosslisted as: ILRLR 2810, LSP 2810, PAM 2810 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Shannon Gleeson
This introductory course introduces students to issues and debates related to international migration and will provide an interdisciplinary foundation to understanding the factors that shape migration flows and migrant experiences.  We will start by reviewing theories of the state and historical examples of immigrant racialization and exclusion in the United States and beyond.  We will critically examine the notions of borders, citizenship/non-citizenship, and the creation of diasporas.  Students will also hear a range of perspectives by exposing them to Cornell guest faculty who do research and teach on migration across different disciplines and methodologies and in different world areas. Examples include demographic researchers concerned with immigrant inequality and family formation, geographic perspectives on the changing landscapes of immigrant metropolises, legal scholarship on the rights of immigrant workers, and the study of immigrant culture from a feminist studies lens.  Offered each fall semester.
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SOC 3010 : Statistics for Sociological Research
Crosslisted as: SOC 6010 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Vida Maralani
This course will introduce students to the theory and mathematics of statistical analysis. Many decisions made by ourselves and others around us are based on statistics, yet few people have a solid grip on the strengths and limitations of these techniques. This course will provide a firm foundation for statistical reasoning and logical inference using probability. While there is math in this course, it is not a math class per se, as a considerable amount of attention is devoted to interpreting statistics as well as calculating them.
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SOC 3080 : Social Networks and Power
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Benjamin Cornwell
In this course, we will consider the role social networks play in the genesis and perpetuation of power, influence, and control in society. We will read and discuss some key sociological theories of power as it manifests in a variety of formal, informal, individual and organizational contexts. We will then explore network methods for analyzing power. The course culminates in individual or group projects that involve network analyses of power in society.
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SOC 3080 : Social Networks and Power
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Benjamin Cornwell
In this course, we will consider the role social networks play in the genesis and perpetuation of power, influence, and control in society. We will read and discuss some key sociological theories of power as it manifests in a variety of formal, informal, individual and organizational contexts. We will then explore network methods for analyzing power. The course culminates in individual or group projects that involve network analyses of power in society.
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SOC 3130 : Sociology of Medicine
Crosslisted as: BSOC 3111, DSOC 3111, STS 3111 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Christine Leuenberger
This course provides an introduction to the ways in which medical practice, the medical profession, and medical technology are embedded in society and culture. We will ask how medicine is connected to various sociocultural factors such as gender, social class, race, and administrative cultures. We will examine the rise of medical sociology as a discipline, the professionalization of medicine, and processes of medicalization and demedicalization. We will look at alternative medical practices and how they differ from and converge with the dominant medical paradigm. We will focus on the rise of medical technology in clinical practice with a special emphases on reproductive technologies. We will focus on the body as a site for medical knowledge, including the medicalization of sex differences, the effect of culture on nutrition, and eating disorders such as obesity and anorexia nervosa. We will also read various classic and contemporary texts that speak to the illness experience and the culture of surgeons, hospitals, and patients, and we will discuss various case studies in the social construction of physical and mental illness.
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SOC 3190 : Contemporary Sociological Theory
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
David Strang
Introduction to the main ideas and lines of research in contemporary sociology, from the emergence of the field in the American academy to the present. We read the work of seminal theorists and researchers such as Robert Merton, Erving Goffman, James Coleman, Harrison White, and Theda Skocpol. Topics include the development of distinctive lines of argument in areas like the study of the face-to-face group, the modern organization, social movements and social revolutions, inequality, and social mobility. The course considers the relationship between intellectual challenges, techniques of social inquiry, and the social context within which ideas are put forward and take hold.
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SOC 3240 : Environmental Sociology
Crosslisted as: DSOC 3240, STS 3241 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
John Zinda
Humans have fraught relationships with the animals, plants, land, water—even geological processes—around us. We come together to revere, conserve, protect the things many call nature. We struggle over who gets to use what, which resources to use or to keep intact, which scientific claims are true and worthy of action. Every environmental concern is on some level a social concern, and more social concerns than we often realize are environmental concerns. In this course, we will examine how people make and respond to environmental change and how groups of people form, express, fight over, and work out environmental concerns. We will consider how population change, economic activity, government action, social movements, and changing ways of thinking shape human-environmental relationships. The fundamental goal of this course is to give you knowledge, analytical tools, and expressive skills that make you confident to address environmental concerns as a social scientist and a citizen. 
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SOC 3250 : Neighborhoods, Housing, and Urban Policy
Crosslisted as: PAM 3250, PAM 5250 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Laura Tach
This course considers the dynamics of housing markets and neighborhoods in American metropolitan areas and the public policies designed to regulate them.  In the first part of the course, we examine the social and economic forces at work in metropolitan neighborhoods, focusing on trends in spatial inequality, segregation, and neighborhood effects. In the second part of the course, we examine the historical evolution of federal and local policies related to subsidized housing, homeownership, and land regulation and analyze empirical debates surrounding the effectiveness of such policies.
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SOC 3380 : Urban Inequality
Crosslisted as: AMST 3380 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Kendra Bischoff
This is a seminar course on urban inequality in the United States.  The first half of the semester will be dedicated to understanding the political, historical, and social determinants of inequality in America's cities. Politically and socially, cities face unique challenges. Municipalities lack much formal authority to resolve issues that arise within their borders, and their populations are highly heterogeneous in terms of ethnicity, race, and social class. In the second half of the course, we will investigate a number of contemporary facets of urban inequality in-depth, such as residential segregation, urban schooling, immigration, and suburban sprawl.
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SOC 3430 : Transformation of Socialist Societies
Crosslisted as: GOVT 3354 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Patricia Young
Three decades from the fall of the Berlin Wall, we have gained broad perspective on the challenges of societal transformations away from socialism.  This course explores the process and social consequences of opening the economies of Eastern Europe, Eurasia, and China to market forces.  We will answer questions about how individuals and social systems respond to the particular challenges of rapid economic and political openings, including growing inequality, demographic challenges, and corruption.  We will compare the Eastern European and Post-Soviet experiences of these issues with the Chinese experience, and highlight the similarities and distinctions between transformations in these societies.
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SOC 3570 : Schooling, Racial Inequality, and Public Policy in America
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Steven Alvarado
After examining alternative explanations for why individuals obtain different amounts and types of educational training, the course focuses on how an individual's family background and race affect his or her trajectory through the educational system. The course covers the specific challenges that have confronted urban schooling in America since the 1960s, including the classic literature on the effects of school and community resources on student achievement as well as the development and later evaluation of school desegregation policies. The course also considers case studies of current policy debates in the US, such as housing segregation and school resegregation, voucher programs for school choice, the motivation for the consequences of the establishment of state-mandated testing requirements, and the prospects of charter schooling.
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SOC 3580 : Big Data on the Social World
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Cristobal Young
This course showcases frontier research that uses big data and graphical analysis to understand our social world. Topics include inequality and opportunity, success in higher education, the gender wage gap, taxing the rich, Chinese censorship, the spread of false news, online dating, and other issues relevant to contemporary society. Although this is not a statistical methods course, prior training in data science (e.g., CS 1380/ORIE 1380/STSCI 1380) or quantitative methods for the social sciences is highly recommended.
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SOC 3580 : Big Data on the Social World
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Cristobal Young
This course showcases frontier research that uses big data and graphical analysis to understand our social world. Topics include inequality and opportunity, success in higher education, the gender wage gap, taxing the rich, Chinese censorship, the spread of false news, online dating, and other issues relevant to contemporary society. Although this is not a statistical methods course, prior training in data science (e.g., CS 1380/ORIE 1380/STSCI 1380) or quantitative methods for the social sciences is highly recommended.
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SOC 3680 : Comparative Corruption
Crosslisted as: GOVT 3683 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Patricia Young
Corruption, and the perception of corruption, pervades many aspects of society and has become a source of political protest around the world. This course focuses on the similarities and differences between forms, causes, and effects of corruption in various environments. The course starts with a discussion of the definitions, causes, and effects of corruption across countries, and then turns to particular forms and contexts where corruption is observed: for example, developed and developing countries, conflict-ridden societies, and international investment. We will also discuss some of the potential solutions to corruption and their costs and benefits for political and civil society.
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SOC 3680 : Comparative Corruption
Crosslisted as: GOVT 3683 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Patricia Young
Corruption, and the perception of corruption, pervades many aspects of society and has become a source of political protest around the world. This course focuses on the similarities and differences between forms, causes, and effects of corruption in various environments. The course starts with a discussion of the definitions, causes, and effects of corruption across countries, and then turns to particular forms and contexts where corruption is observed: for example, developed and developing countries, conflict-ridden societies, and international investment. We will also discuss some of the potential solutions to corruption and their costs and benefits for political and civil society.
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SOC 3710 : Comparative Social Inequalities
Crosslisted as: DSOC 3700 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Tom Hirschl
This course offers a sociological understanding of social inequality and the social construction of difference. Designed from the perspective of comparative historical analysis, we will examine the ways in which class, gender, race/ethnicity, religion, and sexuality differences work across place and time within a shared set of global dynamics. The course will pay special attention to how difference is constructed, institutionalized, and experienced. Thus, the course will not only address inequality based on economic and labor relations, but also emphasize complicated notions of difference and identity to offer an analysis that links inequality to power and forms of rule.
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SOC 3750 : Classical Sociological Theory
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Mabel Berezin
Introduction to the classics in sociology, primarily works by Karl Marx, Max Weber, Emile Durkheim, and Georg Simmel. Students also study the works of Alexis de Tocqueville, Montesquieu, and Joseph Schumpeter. Special emphasis is put on the concepts, ideas, and modes of explanation that characterize the classics. Students also look at these writers' empirical material, and what may be termed the social construction of the classics. Course requirements include active class participation and three tests in class.
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SOC 4120 : Health and Social Context
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Erin York Cornwell
This course examines how the social world gets "under the skin." We'll examine the associations between various aspects of social context – including stratification and inequality, social networks and support, and social environments – and physical health. There are two main components of this course. First, we'll read and discuss previous research on the health effects of social status, patient-physician interactions, employment/work, stress, social networks, social support, loneliness, culture and religion, and the neighborhood context. We'll consider both qualitative and quantitative research on social life and health, with an eye toward identifying the strengths and weaknesses of various methodological approaches and gaps in current knowledge. The second component of this course is focused on the development of your own research regarding the relationship between social context and health. You'll explore this using data from a population-based social survey. Class instruction for this portion of the course will cover research question development, the statistical analysis of survey data, and social scientific writing. Three research reports written during the semester will provide you with a foundation from which you will write and present a final paper that considers how health is shaped by the social world.
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SOC 4370 : Sociology of Sex and Gender
Crosslisted as: FGSS 4371 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Vida Maralani
This course provides an introduction to the theoretical and empirical literature on the sociology of sex and gender. The readings cover theory and methods, feminism, masculinity, intersectionality, international/comparative perspectives, gender roles, and recent sociological research in this area.
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SOC 4390 : Social Dynamics and Computational Methods
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Michael Macy
This course is intended for a select group of highly motivated undergraduates with a keen interest in computational social science. The course provides an opportunity to participate in on-going research in the Social Dynamics Lab. Projects range from online experiments to computer simulations to collection and analysis of data from social media. Students in this course bring a range of skills and experience to the lab, including coding, data analysis, modeling, and running experiments, and the research affords an opportunity to develop these skills further. In rare cases, students bring a project with them to the lab to work on for the semester. In most cases, however, students work in small teams as research assistants for ongoing research projects. In short, the course is an opportunity for "interdependent study" — a team version of the more familiar "independent study." The research projects often lead to papers for submission to academic journals and/or conferences, but most projects are on-going and not completed during the semester. Students also occasionally develop a senior honors thesis from the research in the lab. Weekly meetings provide an opportunity for the projects featured that week to get feedback and suggestions from lab members. On occasion, we have collaborators from other universities Zoom/Skype in as well. Reading assignments are used to get background on a project and as part of the literature review that is needed to identify the project's particular contribution. However, most of a student's time will be spent actively participating in research, not just reading about previous studies. Students keep a weekly log of their activity that is submitted at the end of the semester.
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SOC 4430 : Topics in Social and Political Philosophy
Crosslisted as: AMST 4655, AMST 6656, GOVT 4655, GOVT 6656, PHIL 4470, PHIL 6430, SOC 6430 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Richard Miller
Advanced discussion of topics in social and political philosophy.
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SOC 4540 : Fascism, Nationalism and Populism
Crosslisted as: GOVT 4543 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Mabel Berezin
This course a offers comparative political sociology of democratic and non-democratic institutions in the United States and beyond. Topics will include nationalism, fascism and populism. My focus will be contemporary politics but we will also look at historical fascism. Students will write seminar papers that are based on class exercises.  It will be a hands-on seminar with multiple course materials—scholarly articles, films, novels, and the occasional guest lecturer.
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SOC 4560 : Stars, Scores, and Rankings: Evaluation and Society
Crosslisted as: INFO 4561, STS 4561 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Malte Ziewitz
Evaluation is a pervasive feature of contemporary life. Professors, doctors, countries, hotels, pollution, books, intelligence: there is hardly anything that is not subject to some form of review, rating, or ranking these days. This senior seminar examines the practices, cultures, and technologies of evaluation and asks how value is established, maintained, compared, subverted, resisted, and institutionalized in a range of different settings. Topics include user reviews, institutional audit, ranking and commensuration, algorithmic evaluation, tasting, gossip, and awards. Drawing on case studies from science, technology, culture, accounting, art, environment, and everyday life, we shall explore how evaluation comes to order our lives – and why it is so difficult to resist.
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SOC 4580 : The Science of Social Behavior
Crosslisted as: HD 4580, ILRLR 4580 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Stephen Ceci
Michael Macy
This is a capstone seminar for seniors who are interested in graduate or professional study in scientific disciplines that focus on human behavior and social interaction. The intent is to provide seniors with an opportunity to summon, integrate, and apply insights that they have acquired over the course of their undergraduate education, and give prospective graduate students the opportunity to lead discussions in a large introductory lecture course, "Six Pretty Good Books" (HD/ILRLR/SOC 2580). Each seminar member is part of a two or three-person team that leads the discussion together, under the supervision of a graduate teaching assistant. Seminar meetings are devoted to building lesson plans for leading an effective discussion of each of the six books. The authors vary from year to year but include Malcolm Gladwell, Michelle Alexander, Nate Silver, and Nicholas Christakis. All authors have agreed to participate in a "Q&A" session with the students which seminar members are required to attend. The course meets Cornell's SBA distribution requirement.
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SOC 4750 : Careers and Social Mobility and Knowledge Economy
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Specialized knowledge and know how underlie the division of knowledge in the technology sectors of advanced economies, yet we know surprisingly little about the institutional properties of how knowledge and opportunity are organized. In the global economy entrepreneurs are reshaping regional economies and structures of opportunity. Knowledge economies have emerged as regional centers of innovative activity and knowledge spillover. Understanding jobs, careers and social mobility in the knowledge economy involves a focus on social networks and institutions. The course will draw on evidence from New York City's emergent knowledge economy, Silicon Valley and the Boston area. Enrollment limited to a seminar course.
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SOC 4750 : Careers and Social Mobility and Knowledge Economy
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Victor Nee
Specialized knowledge and know how underlie the division of knowledge in the technology sectors of advanced economies, yet we know surprisingly little about the institutional properties of how knowledge and opportunity are organized. In the global economy entrepreneurs are reshaping regional economies and structures of opportunity. Knowledge economies have emerged as regional centers of innovative activity and knowledge spillover. Understanding jobs, careers and social mobility in the knowledge economy involves a focus on social networks and institutions. The course will draw on evidence from New York City's emergent knowledge economy, Silicon Valley and the Boston area. Enrollment limited to a seminar course.
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SOC 4910 : Independent Study
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Elaine Wethington
Kelly Nielsen
Steven Alvarado
Anna Haskins
Michael Macy
Filiz Garip
David Strang
This is for undergraduates who wish to obtain research experience or to do extensive reading on a special topic.
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SOC 4910 : Independent Study
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Kendra Bischoff
Kelly Nielsen
Kim Weeden
Michael Macy
Erin York Cornwell
Steven Alvarado
Benjamin Cornwell
David Strang
Filiz Garip
Anna Haskins
Vida Maralani
Victor Nee
This is for undergraduates who wish to obtain research experience or to do extensive reading on a special topic.
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SOC 4950 : Honors Research
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Erin York Cornwell
Students choose a sociology faculty member to work with on research to write an honors thesis. Candidates for honors must maintain a cumulative GPA at least an A- in all sociology classes.
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SOC 4950 : Honors Research
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Students choose a sociology faculty member to work with on research to write an honors thesis. Candidates for honors must maintain a cumulative GPA at least an A- in all sociology classes.
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SOC 4960 : Honors Thesis: Senior Year
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Continuation of SOC 4950.  Continue to work with honors supervisor and work on and write an honors thesis.
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SOC 4960 : Honors Thesis: Senior Year
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Continuation of SOC 4950.  Continue to work with honors supervisor and work on and write an honors thesis.
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SOC 5010 : Basic Problems in Sociology I
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Victor Nee
Analysis of theory shaping current sociological research. Examination of several central problems in sociological inquiry provides an occasion for understanding tensions and continuities between classical and contemporary approaches, for indicating the prospects for unifying microsociological and macrosociological orientations, and for developing a critical appreciation of efforts to integrate theory and research.
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SOC 5020 : Basic Problems in Sociology II
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
David Strang
Continuation of SOC 5010. Emphasis is on the logical analysis of theoretical perspectives, theories, and theoretical research programs shaping current sociological research. The course includes an introduction to basic concepts used in the logical analysis of theories and examines their application to specific theories and theoretical research programs. Theoretical perspectives include functionalism, social exchange, and interactionism.
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SOC 5180 : Social Inequality: Contemporary Theories, Debates, and Models
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Kim Weeden
This course serves as an introduction to contemporary theories, debates, and models regarding the structure of social classes, the determinants of social mobility, the sources and cases of racial, ethnic, and gender-based inequality, and the putative rise of postmodern forms of stratification. The twofold objective is to both review contemporary theorizing and to identify areas in which new theories, hypotheses, and research agendas might be fruitfully developed.
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SOC 5190 : Workshop on Social Inequality
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Kim Weeden
This course provides a forum in which students and others can present, discuss, and receive instant feedback on their inequality-related research. Its primary goals is to help students advance their own research; its secondary goal is to introduce selected debates in the contemporary inequality literature in a more comprehensive fashion that is possible in the introductory graduate-level seminar on inequality.
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SOC 5190 : Workshop on Social Inequality
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Kim Weeden
This course provides a forum in which students and others can present, discuss, and receive instant feedback on their inequality-related research. Its primary goals is to help students advance their own research; its secondary goal is to introduce selected debates in the contemporary inequality literature in a more comprehensive fashion that is possible in the introductory graduate-level seminar on inequality.
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SOC 6010 : Statistics for Sociological Research
Crosslisted as: SOC 3010 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Vida Maralani
Sociological theory relies on the analysis of data to make claims about how the world works. This course will provide students with a firm understanding of how to analyze data quantitatively to inform theory. Although this is not a mathematics course, students will learn about the concepts and mechanics that underlie statistical procedures and regression models that are prominent in quantitative sociological research. Students will also have a first-hand opportunity to analyze data that speaks to questions that they are interested in.
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SOC 6020 : Intermediate Statistics for Sociological Research
Crosslisted as: PAM 6020 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Vida Maralani
This course provides the second part of a two-semester introduction to quantitative methods in sociological research. It is designed for first-year graduate students in sociology. The course covers intermediate topics in linear regression, and provides an introduction to models for categorical and count data, the analysis of time data, and longitudinal data. We'll also discuss data-related issues such as missing data and weighting, and data that are complicated by issues of non-random design. While statistical modeling is the focus of the course, we proceed with the assumption that models are only as good as the theoretical and substantive knowledge behind them. Thus, in covering the technical material, we will spend considerable time discussing the link between substantive knowledge and statistical practice.
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SOC 6030 : Graduate Research Practicum
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Victor Nee
This course is designed to assist the student's professional development on a "learning by doing and feedback" basis. The course is organized around presentation and discussion of ongoing research projects. The course is suitable for second and third year students who are writing or expanding their qualifying papers and for advanced graduate students who have dissertation results to share, as well as a venue for independent research pursued by individual or collaborating students. Weekly meetings are typically organized around a student paper draft distributed to the group. As a general rule the course welcomes auditors and all members of the sociology community interested in the variety of research being pursued at Cornell, though participation is with the permission of the instructor(s). In most semesters, two faculty members will jointly lead the course.
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SOC 6040 : Advanced Statistics for Sociological Research
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Cristobal Young
This course extends the study of quantitative methods beyond the required, two-semester graduate methods sequence. We will begin with an in-depth focus on graphical analysis, model uncertainty, techniques for analyzing big data and treating missing data, and issues of causal identification. We will then turn to discussions of specific models selected to complement those covered in existing graduate methods courses for social scientists. The core learning goal is crystal-clear intuitive understanding of these research methods and how they can be put into the service of learning about the social world. Students should have already taken SOC 6010 and SOC 6020 or their equivalents before enrolling in this class.
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SOC 6080 : Proseminar in Sociology
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Richard Swedberg
Discussion of the current state of sociology and of the research interests of members of the graduate field; taught by all members of the field.
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SOC 6080 : Proseminar in Sociology
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Benjamin Cornwell
Discussion of the current state of sociology and of the research interests of members of the graduate field; taught by all members of the field.
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SOC 6110 : Introduction to Network Theory and Methods
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Benjamin Cornwell
Social Network Analysis (SNA), or the mathematical analysis of webs of relationships, is a thriving part of sociology and an active research area for numerous other disciplines. This course is intended to introduce students to the basics of SNA and help them apply it to a variety of research questions. We will discuss the theoretical underpinnings of the area, basic concepts used in SNA analyses, and finally methods for describing and interpreting network data. At the completion of this course students should have a basic understanding of social networks and be able to carry out a variety analyses on their own. NOTE: This course is intended as an introduction for students who have not had exposure to network analysis previously or who are interested in the historical role of networks in sociology.
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SOC 6140 : Immigrant Incorporation
Crosslisted as: PAM 6140 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Matthew Hall
Graduate seminar course on the incorporation of immigrants in host societies, including theoretical perspectives on assimilation and applications to labor markets, housing, schools, and other institutions. Course will also focus on broader social, economic, and political impacts of immigration. Lectures and discussions will mostly focus on research on immigrants to the US, drawing from work in sociology, demography, economics, and political science.
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SOC 6160 : Survey Methods
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Erin York Cornwell
This course will provide a foundation in the fundamentals of social survey design, implementation, and analysis for graduate students who wish to conduct survey research or analyze survey data. We will begin by reviewing theories underlying social scientific survey research, and then consider principles of survey design and administration including sampling methodology, questionnaire construction, internal and external validity, field administration, and interviewer effects. We will review data management and analytic techniques of scaling and scoring, assessing data quality and measurement error, coping with missing data and response bias, weighting, and adjusting for clustered sampling designs. Throughout the course, we will review publicly available social survey data and consider the promise and challenges of new survey methods including web- and smartphone-based surveys, wiki surveys, and mixed-mode data collection
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SOC 6200 : Political Culture
Crosslisted as: AMST 6202, ANTHR 6102, GOVT 6202, HIST 6202 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Richard Bensel
This course will explore the relationship between popular belief, political action, and the institutional deployment of social power. The class will be roughly divided in three parts, opening with a discussion of how the material world influences the culture of a society. The middle section will connect culture to political ideology, including symbolism and the construction of group identity. The last part of the course will consider ways in which cultural symbols and ideology can be manipulated in order to legitimate government authority. We will then, coming full circle, trace how political regimes can influence the social practices from which culture originates.
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SOC 6310 : Qualitative Research Methods for Studying Science
Crosslisted as: STS 6311 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Trevor Pinch
In this Graduate seminar we will discuss the nature, politics and basic assumptions underlying qualitative research. We will examine a selection of qualitative methods ranging from interviewing, oral history, ethnography, participant observation, archival research and visual methods. We will also discuss the relationship between theory and method. All stages of a research project will be discussed - choice of research topic and appropriate methods; human subject concerns and permissions; issues regarding doing research; as well as the process of writing up and publishing research findings.
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SOC 6320 : Inside Technology
Crosslisted as: STS 6321 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Trevor Pinch
Rather than analyze the social impact of technology upon society, this course investigates how society gets inside technology. In other words, is it possible that the very design of technologies embody assumptions about the nature of society? And, if so, are alternative technologies, which embody different assumptions about society, possible? Do engineers have implicit theories about society? Is technology gendered? How can we understand the interaction of society and technology? Throughout the course the arguments are illustrated by detailed examinations of particular technologies, such as the ballistic missile, the bicycle, the electric car, and the refrigerator.
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SOC 6330 : Seminar in Economy and Society
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Victor Nee
Economic sociology extends the sociological perspective to the study economic life. The seminar examines the view that social networks, norms, beliefs and rules motivate and enable economic action in market and nonmarket settings. It integrates the study of ideas and theory in economic sociology with a practicum providing training in the craft of research. Designed for advanced undergraduates interesting in research and graduate students who seek training in economic sociology, the seminar offers a year-long workshop environment enabling and guiding independent and collaborative research.
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SOC 6390 : Social Dynamics and Computational Methods
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Michael Macy
This seminar addresses theoretical and empirical research topics related to the study of complex social networks, or as some have characterized the field, "the new science of networks." These can range from very large online networks to very small artificial networks. Priority is given to topics closely related to current research in the Social Dynamics Laboratory at Cornell.
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SOC 6430 : Topics in Social and Political Philosophy
Crosslisted as: AMST 4655, AMST 6656, GOVT 4655, GOVT 6656, PHIL 4470, PHIL 6430, SOC 4430 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Richard Miller
Advanced discussion of a topic in social and political philosophy.
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SOC 6450 : Neighborhoods, Schools and Education
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Steven Alvarado
This course will examine the literature on social context effects on educational outcomes in the United States. Specifically, students will learn how residential neighborhoods, schools, and peer networks independently affect educational outcomes as well as explore the connections between these spheres of influence. The class will provide an overview of the most robust findings on educational outcomes such as ability scores, school dropout, and college application and enrollment. Students will also apply the major lessons from the literature to their own empirical  assessment of an educational outcome of their choice.
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SOC 6460 : Seminar in Economic Sociology
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Filiz Garip
Introduces the field of economic sociology and covers major topics addressed by sociologists studying the intersection of economy and society. We begin with classic statements on economic sociology and then move to the invigoration of the field in recent years, reading works that have been instrumental in this invigoration. Consideration is given to the several variants of "institutionalism" that have informed the sociological study of markets, organizations, and economic exchange.
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SOC 6610 : Text and Networks in Social Science Research
Crosslisted as: GOVT 6619, HD 6610 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Will Hobbs
This is a course on networks and text in quantitative social science. The course will cover published research using text and social network data, focusing on health, politics, and everyday life, and it will introduce methods and approaches for incorporating high-dimensional data into familiar research designs. Students will evaluate past studies and propose original research.
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SOC 6660 : Event History Analysis
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
David Strang
Event history analysis (also known as hazard or survival analysis) is a family of methods for the study of discrete outcomes over time. Typical sociological examples are demographic events (births, deaths), entry and exit from a social status (like marriage) and structural change (such as social revolutions). This class introduces main concepts, models, and measurement issues in event history analysis, and provides students with an opportunity to gain practical familiarity with these methods. 
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SOC 6910 : Independent Study
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Richard Swedberg
For graduates who wish to obtain research experience or to do extensive reading on a special topic. Permission to enroll for independent study is granted only to students who present an acceptable prospectus and secure the agreement of a faculty member to serve as supervisor for the project throughout the semester.
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SOC 6910 : Independent Study
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
For graduates who wish to obtain research experience or to do extensive reading on a special topic. Permission to enroll for independent study is granted only to students who present an acceptable prospectus and secure the agreement of a faculty member to serve as supervisor for the project throughout the semester.
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SOC 8910 : Graduate Research
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Benjamin Cornwell
Work with a faculty member on a project that is related to your dissertation work.
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SOC 8920 : Graduate Research
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Work with a faculty member on a project that is related to your dissertation work.
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SOC 8950 : Thesis Research
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Michael Macy
Work with chair of your committee on your dissertation work.
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SOC 8960 : Thesis Research
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Work with chair of your committee on your dissertation work.
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